November 19, 2016: Grand Mosques and Grand Desert Adventure in Abu Dhabi

The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is located in Abu Dhabi, and is the largest mosque in the United Arab Emirates.  It holds up to 40,000 worshippers, has four massive minarets, each 106 meters tall with designs incorporating elements from major periods in Islamic history, and 82 domes, each inscribed in gold with verses from the Holy Quran.   Continue reading “November 19, 2016: Grand Mosques and Grand Desert Adventure in Abu Dhabi”

November 16, 2016: Opening Eyes in Dubai

After bidding Bahrain a fond adieu, our TEACH Fellowship delegation proceded to the global crossroads of the region – Dubai, the richest of the United Arab Emirates.  On first blush, the city itself is sprawling and urban and at the remove of the airport gives no sense of the opulance and glamor with which it has branded itself.  Though it definitely seems prosperous.   Continue reading “November 16, 2016: Opening Eyes in Dubai”

November 15, 2016: Bon Voyage, Bahrain!

It’s been a wild whirlwind through Bahrain, a country of 1.3 million, half of whom are guest workers and not really Bahraini at all.  This is a country that is at its core a conservative, traditional Muslim country – at once eager and willing to accommodate its many resident aliens, who range from American and British expats to Filipino nannies and Indian laborers.   Continue reading “November 15, 2016: Bon Voyage, Bahrain!”

November 14, 2016: Big Buildings and Bigger Ideas in Bahrain

What is the purpose of education?  Is it solely for the individual’s benefit – so that he or she can get a good job and have a successful career?  Or is it to produce a socially conscious citizen, someone who is curious and compassionate about the world and the people in it? Continue reading “November 14, 2016: Big Buildings and Bigger Ideas in Bahrain”

November 13, 2016: Alive and Well in the Kingdom of Bahrain

After a truly heroic 24 hours of travel – from Florida to Atlanta, Atlanta to Amsterdam, Amsterdam to Qatar, and Qatar to Bahrain – I am proud to report that I am alive and well in the Kingdom of Bahrain.  I’m here with a dozen other teachers on the TEACH Fellowship sponsored by the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber of Commerce. Continue reading “November 13, 2016: Alive and Well in the Kingdom of Bahrain”

Preparing for Departure with the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber’s Teachers Educating Across Cultures in Harmony (TEACH) Fellowship.

Proud to be participating in the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber’s Teachers Educating Across Cultures in Harmony (TEACH) Fellowship. I leave for Bahrain, UAE and Qatar in just over two weeks, and I’ve been reading up on the history of the Middle East and Islam with the following books: Continue reading “Preparing for Departure with the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber’s Teachers Educating Across Cultures in Harmony (TEACH) Fellowship.”

Open Ended Social Studies on YouTube: The Inca

Check out the inaugural episode of the Open Ended Social Studies YouTube series on the Inca.  It’s a great supplement to our featured lesson on the Inca.  Continue reading “Open Ended Social Studies on YouTube: The Inca”

Meet my World – a film by Peruvian youth, in their own words.

Meet my World – a film by Peruvian youth, in their own words.

From the filmmakers:

Amantani is an Anglo Peruvian NGO, which works to help children from marginalised Quechua families to access education, stimulating social development for Peru’s most disadvantaged communities. Together with our friends at Andina restaurant in London, we have created Meet My World; a participatory film campaign developed by indigenous children from the Andes of Peru.

Continue reading “Meet my World – a film by Peruvian youth, in their own words.”

Unrecognized Potential: Terra Preta, Ancient Orchards, and Life in the Amazon

Until relatively recently, it was widely believed that the Amazon Rainforest was incapable of sustaining large scale human development.  New findings have challenged this view, and evidence of ancient agriculture suggests that humans once developed this fragile region in ways so subtle that – in the form of carefully managed soils and prehistoric orchards – they have been hiding in plain sight all this time, challenging the basic tenants of “agriculture” as western eyes tend to recognize it. Continue reading “Unrecognized Potential: Terra Preta, Ancient Orchards, and Life in the Amazon”

The Andes, the Inca, the Spanish, and the Making of Modern South America

Continue reading “The Andes, the Inca, the Spanish, and the Making of Modern South America”