Mapping Our Human Story: A Mini-Doc on Openendedsocialstudies in Action!

Here’s a short documentary featuring an Open Ended Social Studies lesson on The Silk Road playing out in a sixth grade world history classroom:

United Arab Emirates Case Study: How would you diversify your single resource economy?

This lesson was reported from:

Continue reading “United Arab Emirates Case Study: How would you diversify your single resource economy?”

November 22, 2016: Haram in Qatar, or How I Learned Not to Cast the First Stone

According to The Qatar Tribune, Qatari customs officials destroyed some 31,000 bottles of wine seized after routine inspections of incoming shipping containers in the nation’s port. Continue reading “November 22, 2016: Haram in Qatar, or How I Learned Not to Cast the First Stone”

November 21, 2016: The Foreign Service Explains the Day

One of the best aspects of this fellowship is the access it grants to the US embassy in each country that we visit.  Outside of a tragic terrorist attack in Libya, most Americans probably haven’t given much thought to the fine, knowledgable folks who represent US interests in hundreds of countries around the world. Continue reading “November 21, 2016: The Foreign Service Explains the Day”

November 20, 2016: Living History in the UAE

If you look around Openendedsocialstudies.org, you’ll find that I love history. Continue reading “November 20, 2016: Living History in the UAE”

November 19, 2016: Grand Mosques and Grand Desert Adventure in Abu Dhabi

The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is located in Abu Dhabi, and is the largest mosque in the United Arab Emirates.  It holds up to 40,000 worshippers, has four massive minarets, each 106 meters tall with designs incorporating elements from major periods in Islamic history, and 82 domes, each inscribed in gold with verses from the Holy Quran.   Continue reading “November 19, 2016: Grand Mosques and Grand Desert Adventure in Abu Dhabi”

November 15, 2016: Bon Voyage, Bahrain!

It’s been a wild whirlwind through Bahrain, a country of 1.3 million, half of whom are guest workers and not really Bahraini at all.  This is a country that is at its core a conservative, traditional Muslim country – at once eager and willing to accommodate its many resident aliens, who range from American and British expats to Filipino nannies and Indian laborers.   Continue reading “November 15, 2016: Bon Voyage, Bahrain!”

November 14, 2016: Big Buildings and Bigger Ideas in Bahrain

What is the purpose of education?  Is it solely for the individual’s benefit – so that he or she can get a good job and have a successful career?  Or is it to produce a socially conscious citizen, someone who is curious and compassionate about the world and the people in it? Continue reading “November 14, 2016: Big Buildings and Bigger Ideas in Bahrain”

November 13, 2016: Alive and Well in the Kingdom of Bahrain

After a truly heroic 24 hours of travel – from Florida to Atlanta, Atlanta to Amsterdam, Amsterdam to Qatar, and Qatar to Bahrain – I am proud to report that I am alive and well in the Kingdom of Bahrain.  I’m here with a dozen other teachers on the TEACH Fellowship sponsored by the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber of Commerce. Continue reading “November 13, 2016: Alive and Well in the Kingdom of Bahrain”

Preparing for Departure with the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber’s Teachers Educating Across Cultures in Harmony (TEACH) Fellowship.

Proud to be participating in the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber’s Teachers Educating Across Cultures in Harmony (TEACH) Fellowship. I leave for Bahrain, UAE and Qatar in just over two weeks, and I’ve been reading up on the history of the Middle East and Islam with the following books: Continue reading “Preparing for Departure with the Bilateral US-Arab Chamber’s Teachers Educating Across Cultures in Harmony (TEACH) Fellowship.”